Posted by SamClaflinFans on April 30th, 2021


With the help of our friend Olga, we have compiled below various movie reviews of Sam’s latest film, Every Breath You Take:

Claflin elevates the formulaic quality by playfully wavering between charismatic and psychotic as he burrows deeper into the Clark women’s lives, and thus Philip’s psyche.” And this “Rated R for Sam Claflin’s wreaking havoc.” New York Times

Claflin is ultimately why the film is as enjoyable as it is, with his gradually unnerving James proving evermore the live-wire among the more auto-pilot mentality of both Affleck and Monaghan.” The AU Review

Sam Claflin does most of the heavy lifting here, portraying James with a balance of charisma, elusive allure, and calculated danger. The actor has been in dramas, fantasies, and romance movies, but he’s never played a twisted character like James before and it’s engaging to watch Claflin in the role as his character unravels. James’ appearance seems questionable right from the start, though the extent to which he’s untrustworthy ends up being the true surprise.Screenrant

Sam Claflin brings a dark performance, expanding outward from the generally “good guy” role he has played in the past. There is a flicker of madness in his eyes, all while uttering sweet-nothings to those he is with. There is an unpredictability masked within a cool exterior.Film Inquiry

Sam Claflin does an excellent job of switching between personas of the charming and helpful grief-stricken brother and the psychopathic menace that he actually turns out to be. There’s something about the unhinged glint in his eyes that you can see from time to time combined with his odd behavior when he’s in his sister’s house throughout the film that warns you his character will turn out to be very dangerous.Nerds and Beyond

“Claflin, of ‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’ fame, brings the same charm to this role that he brought in ‘The Hunger Games’ franchise when playing off Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson. However, very quickly that charm takes on a new meaning and becomes incredibly eerie and sinister which was impressive to see that line walked so well. Luckily, Claflin balances the charm and creepiness in just the right way to give the best performance in the film.” Hollywood Insider

“the movie is still enjoyable thanks largely to Claflin’s great work. Nothing anyone does is unexpected or surprising, but Claflin’s deftness in creative a sociopathic, manipulative character is great to see.Macarthur Advertiser



Posted by SamClaflinFans on April 14th, 2020


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Variety: “make you believe that for all his cultivation and civilized sex appeal, he lives inside a spectacular thicket of self-doubt that’s even more enchanting than pure confidence…well, that takes a true actor, and maybe a star. And that’s the quality Sam Claflin has in the minor but captivating “Love Wedding Repeat.”

HavenSOS News: “Claflin reveals himself to be a scholar when it comes to all kinds of awkward sputtering, and in any case many of humiliation the case of Jack’s encounters, this performance is a treat.

 

 



Posted by SamClaflinFans on August 20th, 2019


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The Nightingale came out in various cinemas across the US and Australia this month, as well as during film festivals such as the London Sundance Film Festival and the Venice International Film Festival. With the help of our friend Olga, we compiled a few reviews mentioning Sam’s amazing performance as Hawkins in the movie. Obviously, this is a non-exhaustive list that we will try to update.

The Nightingale also won Best Australian Feature Award at the 2019 Melbourne International Film Festival and the Special Jury Prize at the Venice Film Festival.

You can also watch our interview with Sam and spoiler-free review below:

Awards Circuit: “Meanwhile, Claflin showcases career-best work. When he is pushed, he is terrifying to everyone around him. He shows no remorse and pure anger at those around him. His entitlement drips from the screen, and his performance as an angry white man comes through in spades. He is dangerous and violent, but what could be the most chilling of all is the righteous way he performs these acts.”

Slashfilm: “On the opposite end of the spectrum is Claflin, as the consistently cruel Hawkins. This is a tricky character, because Claflin has to portray him as both someone with zero redeeming qualities who also thinks he’s entirely justified in his actions. It’s a tightrope act – in Hawkins’ mind, the violence he enacts towards Clare, Billy and others is perfectly natural, because he’s superior to them. The actor nails this…

Variety:  “Sam Claflin, playing adventurously and horrifically against type.”

A.V. Club Claflin, so charismatic in the Hunger Games and elsewhere, provides shades of a soul, shining very faintly beneath his barbarism.”

Joe Blo’s Movie Emporium:Claflin’s never disappeared into a part like this, thoroughly embracing how repugnant the character is in a way that calls timing vintage Oliver Reed.”

Nerdist:the towering performances (especially by Sam Claflin, whose Hawkins is one of the most sadistic, cruel, and eminently punchable villains since Joffrey Baratheon)”

Collider: “Sam Claflin brings an especially vile form of evil to screen playing the leader of the aforementioned group of soldiers, Lt. Hawkins.”

Jumpcut online: “Another surprising aspect of The Nightingale is that it features a completely different kind of role for Sam Claflin. Claflin has certainly been moving on and growing up from his origins in big-budget franchises (The Hunger Games, Pirates of the Caribbean, Snow White) and rom-coms (Love, Rosie and Me Before You). In recent years, he has been taking on much more morally complex roles in The Riot Club, My Cousin Rachel and Journey’s End. The role of Hawkins here is definitely his most out-and-out villainous and evil role yet, but one he leans into well, without becoming cartoonish. He mostly sticks to his accent – which is of Northern England (yet another unexpected choice) throughout and entirely divests himself of any of the boyish charm which he displayed as recently as last year’s Adrift.”

Weliveentertainment“If you are like me, you probably never thought you could hate Sam Claflin because he always plays that lovable nice guy that somehow manages to die in every other film. Well, I hate to break it to you, but Jennifer Kent has managed to make Claflin play a character that is so deplorable and vile that you may never be able to look at Sam Claflin the same way ever again. His performance is so deeply disturbing because he plays a character that shows zero remorse for his actions. He rapes and kills without a care in the world. Claflin’s performance as Hawkins is some next level acting. I honestly can’t believe that I was watching the same guy who was in Their Finest because he transforms into a man that not only abuses his power but one that doesn’t have a single redeemable quality about him.”

The Lamplight Review:“Claflin, so dashing and charming in the Pirates of the Caribbean and Hunger Games franchises, is absolutely monstrous as the sadistic Lieutenant, and viewers will have a difficult time conjuring up a cinematic villain that evokes so much hatred.

Discussing Film: “Sam Claflin is unrecognisable as the irredeemable white-devil-like officer, his performance is unfathomably intense and Claflin gets lost within.”

The List: “As Claflin bristles with dangerous levels of entitlement, it recalls his performance in contemporary drama The Riot Club, with white male privilege then and now spilling over into violence.”

Observer:A veteran of the Hunger Games films, Sam Claflin is terrifying as Hawkins, the lieutenant who is infatuated with Clare’s beauty but has complete disregard for her humanity.”

Hollywood News: “So too is Sam Claflin, whose Hawkins is about as vile a human as possible to be depicted on screen.”

Rolling Stone: “Claflin, the blond dreamboat Finnick Odair in The Hunger Games series, plays this colonial monster without dropping his charm and good looks, which makes him doubly scary. It’s a bold gamble of a performance that pays off.”

Reeling Reviews:but the most astounding performance comes from Claflin, showing complex layers of villainy rooted in the fragility of the male ego like nothing we’ve seen from him before.”

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Posted by SamClaflinFans on September 9th, 2017


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Below you will find all of the reviews from critics & fans alike for Journey’s End & Sam’s performance as Stanhope as & when they arrive following the film’s screenings at TIFF & LFF prior to its official UK release in February 2018!

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“There isn’t a weak link in a pitch perfect ensemble cast that stretches from Paul Bettany’s kindly, honourable father figure Osborne, to Toby Jones philosophical cook Mason and Sam Claflin’s embittered leader. All underplay beautifully, conveying the quiet reality of a desperate situation. It is a governing sense of restraint that lends the film such an emotional kick, and breathes fresh life into an old classic.”  – Screen Daily

 

“Director Saul Dibb is still able to make the dialogue-heavy drama feel cinematic with the help of Ben Wheatley’s cinematographer, Laurie Rose, who captures everything in a kind of drab beauty. In Journey’s End, filmmakers have created another fitting tribute to a generation of veterans whose fight really didn’t end that long ago. Contrary to what Mel Gibson may believe, this is actually possible to do without the use of excessive violence.” – Dork Shelf

 

“Much of the credit goes to the astute writing and punchy yet understated staging. But primarily, the film keeps audiences engrossed in the personalities involved, their fatigue, disillusionment and residual humanity, as well as the tenderness they extend towards one another where needed. The entire cast is fine, with Claflin (“The Hunger Games,” “My Cousin Rachel”) excellent in the role Olivier originated.” – Variety 

 

“This is most vividly felt in the character of Osborne, a thoughtful and altogether admirable fellow wonderfully played in an uncharacteristically low-key performance by Bettany. Butterfield has little choice but to play it earnest as the well-off young man too naive to know what he’s in for, while Claflin, in the role originated by a 21-year-old Laurence Olivier onstage, is quite on the nose portraying an intelligent man steadily cracking under pressure, bottle in hand. Toby Jones provides modest humorous relief as the unit’s cook”  Hollywood Reporter

 

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